Tag Archives: cabbage

Fall Vegetables and Why Fresh is Best

MEN-AS09-fall-garden-vegetablesI love Fall. Every year when the weather cools and the gardens are bursting with the new harvest I am in heaven. When you can get fresh harvested Fall vegetables, they taste so much better than the stuff we find in the grocery store. I stalk my local farmers markets for winter squash, brussel sprouts, and other wonders that need a bit of cold weather for the flavors to develop. Nothing makes me more happy than to run home from the market and prepare those vegetables before they even see the inside of my refrigerator. I am going to give you a list of Fall vegetables and when they are at their peak of flavor. I am also listing out some of my favorite recipes to prepare them.

Beets – Beets can be harvested late spring through Autumn. Beets are most flavorful when they are between 2 and 3 inches in diameter.

Broccoli  – Broccoli can be grown year-round in temperate climates so we’ve forgotten it even has a season. It is more sweet, less bitter and sharp when harvested in the cooler temperatures of fall in most climates.

Broccoli raabe, rapini –  A more bitter and leafier vegetable than its cousin, broccoli, but likes similar cool growing conditions.

Brussels sprouts – Brussels sprouts grow on a stalk, and if you see them for sale that way snap them up – they’ll last quite a bit longer than once they’re cut. Look for them after your first frost or cold front for the most flavorful sprouts.

Cabbage – Cabbage is bright and crisp when raw and mellows and sweetens the longer it’s cooked. The cooler the weather when it’s harvested, the sweeter it tends to taste (this effect is called “frost kissed”).

Carrots – Carrots are harvested year-round in temperate areas. Unusual varieties are harvested during the carrot’s natural season, which is late summer and fall. True baby carrots – not the milled down versions of regular carrots sold as “baby carrots” in bags at grocery stores – are available in the spring and early summer. Locally grown carrots are often available from storage through early winter even in colder climates.

Cauliflower – Cauliflower may be grown, harvested, and sold year-round, but it is by nature a cool weather crop and at its best in fall and winter and into early spring.

Celery Root – Celeriac/celery root is at its best in the cooler months of fall, winter, and early spring (except in cold climates, where you’ll find it during the summer and early fall).

Celery – Celery is at its best in the fall, with its harvest continuing through winter in warm and temperate climates.

Chard – Chard like all cooking greens, chard turns bitter when it gets too hot. Chard grows year-round in temperate areas, is best harvested in late summer or early fall in colder areas, and fall through spring in warmer regions.

Fennel – Fennel’s natural season is from fall through early spring. Like most cool weather crops, the plant bolts and turns bitter in warmer weather.

Kale – Kale is like all hearty cooking greens – cooler weather keeps it sweet.

Kohlrabi – Kohlrabi (late fall) comes into season by the end of fall, but stays at its sweet best into winter.

Leeks – Leeks more than about 1 1/2 inches wide tend to have tough inner cores. The top green leaves should look fresh – avoid leeks with wilted tops.

Parsnips – Parsnips look like white carrots and have a great nutty flavor. Look for thinner parsnips, since fatter ones tend to have a thick, woody core you need to cut out.

Rutabagas – Rutabagas also known as “yellow turnips” and “Swedes” are a sweet, nutty root vegetables perfect in stews, roasted, or mashed with plenty of butter.

Shallots – Shallots are harvested in late summer and into fall, and are at their sweetest when fresh.

Sweet Potatoes – Sweet potatoes are often sold as “yams.” They store well and are available from local sources year-round in warmer areas; from late summer through winter other places.

Turnips – Turnips have a sharp but bright and sweet flavor. Look for turnips that feel heavy for their size.

Winter Squash – Winter squash of all sorts comes into season in early fall and usually last well into winter. The squash you find in your local grocer could be up to a year old and the flavor will a shadow of what it once was. Find these fresh at your local farmers market to really experience winter squash.

Cabbage and Bacon Pie

Cabbage and Bacon Pie

Prep Time: 0

Yield: 6

In Ireland, the term bacon is used loosely; the meat in this casserole is actually ham.

Ingredients

  • 6 russet potatoes, peeled and quartered
  • 14 tbsp. butter
  • 6 tbsp. flour
  • 5 cups milk
  • 2/3 cup chopped fresh parsley
  • Salt and freshly gound black pepper
  • 1 head savoy cabbage, chopped
  • 1 cup beavy cream
  • 2 scallions, trimmed and finely chopped
  • 1 1/2 lbs. baked ham, diced

Instructions

  1. 1. Preheat oven to 400º. Put potatoes into a medium pot, cover with cold water, and boil over medium-high heat until soft, 30-35 minutes.
    2. Meanwhile, melt 6 tbsp. of the butter in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Add flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Add milk and cook, stirring often, until sauce thickens, 8-10 minutes. Add parsley and salt and pepper to taste and set aside.
    3. Boil cabbage in a medium pot of boiling salted water over high heat until soft, about 5 minutes. Drain and set aside.
    4. Drain potatoes, return them to pot, and mash until smooth. Stir in cream, the remaining 8 tbsp. butter, scallions, and salt and pepper to taste and set aside.
    5. Scatter ham in bottom of a large baking dish, cover with cabbage, then sauce, then mashed potatoes, in that order, piping potates through a pastry bag fitted with a 1/2" star tip, if you like. Bake until bubbling hot and golden on top, 30-35 minutes.
http://www.culinarycafe.com/2009/08/17/cabbage-and-bacon-pie/

Colcannon

Colcannon

Prep Time: 0

Yield: 6

Ingredients

  • 1 1/4 pounds kale, tough stems removed, washed (or use green cabbage)
  • 2 cups water
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 1/4 lbs potatoes, peeled and quartered
  • 1 cup cleaned and chopped leeks (white only)
  • 1 cup milk
  • pinch of ground mace
  • salt & freshly ground black pepper to taste
  • 1/2 cup melted butter
  • 1 tbsp chopped parsley

Instructions

  1. In a large pot, simmer kale, covered, in 2 cups water and the oil for 10 minutes.
  2. Drain and chop fine; set aside and keep warm. In a small pot, bring the potatoes and water to cover to a boil and simmer until tender.
  3. In another small pot, simmer the leeks, covered, in the milk for 10 minutes, and keep warm.
  4. Drain the potatoes and puree them, using a potato ricer or masher, into the large pot.
  5. Add the leeks with their milk, and the cooked kale.
  6. Beat with a wooden spoon until fluffy.
  7. Season with mace, salt and pepper.
  8. Mound on a plate and top with melted butter.
  9. Garnish with parsley.
http://www.culinarycafe.com/2009/08/17/colcannon/

Corned Beef and Cabbage

Corned Beef and Cabbage

Prep Time: 0

Yield: 0

Corned Beef and Cabbage

Ingredients

  • 2 cups of water
  • 1/4 cup honey
  • 2 tablespoons Dijon-style mustard, divided
  • 1 medium head cabbage, cut into 8 wedges ( approx. 2 pounds)
  • 3 tablespoons butter or margarine, softened
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons chopped fresh dill, OR 1/2 teaspoon fried dill weed
  • 2 1/2 to 3 1/2 pound corned beef brisket

Instructions

  1. Place brisket and water in Dutch oven; cover tightly and cook 1 hour at 350 degrees (F). ( It is very important to simmer the meat slowly because boiling will cause meat to become tough.) Turn brisket over and continue cooking, covered, 1 1/2 to 2 hours, or until meat is tender. Remove brisket from cooking liquid and place, flat-side up, on rack in broiler pan so surface of meat is 3 to 4 inches from heat.

    Combine honey with 1 tablespoon mustard; brush half of mixture over top of brisket and broil 3 minutes. Brush with remaining mixture and continue broiling 2 minutes, or until brisket is glazed. Meanwhile, steam cabbage 15 to 20 minutes, or until tender. Combine remaining mustard with butter and dill; spread over hot cabbage wedges. Carve brisket diagonally across the grain into thin slices and serve with cabbage.
http://www.culinarycafe.com/2009/08/17/corned-beef-and-cabbage/